Many diseases, including Parkinson’s disease, can be treated with electrical stimulation from an electrode implanted in the brain. However, the electrodes can produce scarring, which diminishes their effectiveness and can necessitate additional surgeries to replace them.

Now, in a study published in Scientific Reports, researchers have demonstrated that making these electrodes much smaller can essentially eliminate this scarring, potentially allowing the devices to remain in the brain for much longer.

Many Parkinson’s patients have benefited from treatment with low-frequency electrical current delivered to a part of the brain involved in movement control. The electrodes used for this deep brain stimulation are a few millimeters in diameter. After being implanted, they gradually generate scar tissue through the constant rubbing of the electrode against the surrounding brain tissue. This process, known as gliosis, contributes to the high failure rate of such devices: About half stop working within the first six months.

Previous studies have suggested that making the implants smaller or softer could reduce the amount of scarring, so the research team set out to measure the effects of both reducing the size of the implants and coating them with a soft polyethylene glycol (PEG) hydrogel.

In mice, the researchers tested both coated and uncoated glass fibers with varying diameters and found that there is a tradeoff between size and softness. Coated fibers produced much less scarring than uncoated fibers of the same diameter. However, as the electrode fibers became smaller, down to about 30 microns (0.03 millimeters) in diameter, the uncoated versions produced less scarring, because the coatings increase the diameter. This suggests that a 30-micron, uncoated fiber is the optimal design for implantable devices in the brain.

The question now is whether fibers that are only 30 microns in diameter can be adapted for electrical stimulation, drug delivery, and recording electrical activity in the brain. Such devices could be potentially useful for treating Parkinson’s disease or other neurological disorders, the researchers say.

Paper: “Making brain implants smaller could prolong their lifespan: Thin fibers could be used to deliver drugs or electrical stimulation, with less damage to the brain.”
Reprinted from materials provided by the Massachusetts Institute of Technology.

Ιούλιος 26, 2017